gay

I love you, anyways

I know you’ve been taught that big and black is scary, that being gay is a sin, and if I don’t repent before the clock strikes life, I’ll reside in the pits of Hell. I know you’ve been taught that going against the odds of fashion means that I’m a bastard, and my father must be to blame. I know you’ve been taught to believe that if I lose too much weight I must have AIDS, yet with all of this hateful “knowledge”…

I must relay this:
“I love you, anyways 💜”

Till tomorrow,
When we are reminded of the worlds sorrow.

PS: When you wake up in the morning, make sure you say “hello,” And be thankful to have laid sin free, propped on a sacred pillow.

Gay Dating in a Straight World: John Boughton’s Guide to The Gay Dating Game

Let me introduce to you, the safest & best dating app there is for men in the LGBTQIA+ community.

Welcome back ya cuties! Today on Gay Dating in a Straight World (GDSW), we’re going to stick with the theme of dating apps and talk about a very special one. It’s exclusively for gay, queer, bisexual, pansexual, asexual & trans men. It’s name? Chappy.

Coming Out For Someone Else

Don’t

That’s the short answer. Of course, it isn’t as simple as that. Being a member of the LGBTQIA+ community and living a thrilling, freeing gay life every day, you start to pick up some skills. One of those is picking out your fellow brothers and sisters before you’ve even met them. What I’m talking about is a “gaydar.” It’s a popular phrase, coined somewhere in the 1990s, but some say it was first heard in the show “Futurama.” I tried to do some research, but it was all very limited. So if you find out where it comes from, let me know. But back to this article! A gaydar is a tool one possesses in sensing someone else’s sexuality. I’m sure if you’re reading this blog, you know exactly what I’m talking about. But if you don’t – it might be time to get out of the house more often – but I’ll do you a favor this time and help you out a little bit.

Gay Dating in a Straight World: John Boughton’s Guide to The Gay Dating Game

Trying to find that perfect match in a society where we’re “swimming against the stream,” is like attempting to complete a 1,000 piece color spectrum puzzle.

It’s not easy, but all we want is that one special loved one. So we sit at that table, organizing pieces by the candlelight, and one-by-one, the puzzle (might) start to come together. As a gay man who has been single for almost 2 years, I know the game a little too well. So I’m here to impart some of my wisdom and share some interesting experiences that can hopefully help all you lovely people in avoiding what could potentially be a sad, forever alone life.

Little Gay Comix: #4 – Creative Block

Been a little low on brain fuel lately, but I’m working on it!

180°

 

 

A Short Story by John Boughton

 

Jenna paced her room, wondering how the conversation would go. Would they accept her? Would they disown her? Would she be sent to an orphanage or forced to live on the street? All of these were questions racing through her head on a quiet, cold Wednesday evening. She rehearsed what she would say to her parents. She wanted desperately to tell them who she truly was. She had stalled through the car ride home, she stalled all throughout dinner, and she continued to stall through the night as she did the “homework” she didn’t really have.

 

The time was approaching. She couldn’t bear to continue the life she was living. She had a partner at school and they loved each other very much. They had been secretly dating for about three months and all she wanted was for them to meet her parents. But first, her parents needed to know the truth. That was the hard part. She thought it would be easy, like any other kind of conversation. Like talking about what to eat for dinner, or whether she interested in going to her brother’s concert on Saturday night (she wasn’t). But nonetheless, she was frozen, Whenever the words approached her lips, her tongue became paralyzed and she would blurt out some fun fact about the African Savannah or Eleanor Roosevelt. It was bad. But tonight she knew she had to tell them because the Winter Formal was this Friday and her parents had been begging her to ask someone out. Just not who they expected, or frankly, wanted. It didn’t matter though. She loved them with all her heart and whether her parents liked them or not, it was her choice and her life.

 

She gathered her strength, took a deep breath, and exited her room. As she walked down the stairs her hands were hot, clammy and vibrating. It felt like the Heat Miser was giving her a vigorous handshake. Her parents were downstairs watching the News. They were both in the PJ’s and about to turn in for the night. This is was it.

Media Review: “It’s Okay to Be Gay” – Doug Armstrong

In a new comedy EP, Doug Armstrong sings the kinds of songs we can relate to.

Doug Armstrong’s debut comedy EP “It’s Okay to Be Gay” is quite the joyride. From beginning to end it is filled with light-hearted, positive humor that can make any confident, gay man like myself want to shout from a rooftop “I like dick, balls and bum!” – a line from the “What I Like About Guys,” the last song on the EP. Each song sends off a positive message and informs the public of the daily struggles of what gay men go through.

The Moment My Life Changed Forever – A Coming Out Story

The moment my life changed forever happened in a college common room on a late Friday evening. 

I was with my ex-girlfriend (then current) after a pleasant dinner at Red Robin. Our three-year anniversary was coming up in the next few days. However, despite the long-run our relationship had things were getting rocky. The night before we had a long phone conversation about us and why things were going downhill. In the recent months building up to this, we would talk on the phone for maybe two minutes and run out of things to talk about. There would be awkward silences when we would FaceTime. We would not text as often. Little things were happening that were telling us our relationship was failing and that made us nervous. By the time the conversation ended it was around 3am and we decided that we should really finish the conversation in person. I planned to come up that Sunday, also the day before our anniversary.

As I went to bed that night I had countless thoughts about what was going to occur in the next few days. Would we talk like normal, or not speak until we met in person? Is this going to be the end of us and possibly our friendship? Am I going to lose my best friend? As these thoughts reeled through my head, I thought about what she was going through and if she was having the same thoughts. It was torture for myself, but to think that the person I’m supposed to love the most is hurting right now was unbearable. I couldn’t wait until Sunday and I had a feeling she didn’t want to either. So I texted her and told her I was coming up that day. I skipped my classes, got in my 2011 Navy Blue Honda Civic named Brad and drove up to her school.